Search
221 Edgewater Avenue Edgewater Park, NJ 08010 Phone: 609-387-9847

Visit the Red Dragon Facebook Page for news about The Shipman Mansion

The Shipman Mansion is open for tours on the first weekend of the month during April - November from 11-3 on Saturday and Sundays.  For appointments at other times, please call 856-986-7969. 

The Shipman Mansion is located at 221 Edgewater Avenue in Edgewater Park, NJ.  

Upcoming Program Events

2018 Open House Dates:

 April 7 and 8; 11 am - 3 pm

 May 5 and 6;  11 am - 3 pm

 June 2 and 3; 11 am - 3 pm

 July  7 and 8; 11 am - 3 pm

 August 4 and 5; 11 am - 3 pm

 September 1 and 2; 11 am - 3 pm

 October 6 and 7; 11 am - 3 pm

 November 3 and 4; 11 am - 3 pm

 

March 28 Lecture at 7 pm - House Tour at 6 pm

Lecture by Richard Barrios - Author of Must See Musicals -From "The Jazz Singer" in 1927 all the way to "La La Land" in modern times, Richard knows them all and will highlight his talk with film clips.  A Must See Presentation! 

April 25 Lecture at 7 pm - House Tour at 6 pm

Lecture by David Giannetto - David will focus on the factors that led to the disappearance of the almost mythical group of Delaware River watermen and the one artifact that survives them, the Delaware River hunting decoy.

May 30 Lecture at 7 pm - House Tour at 6 pm

Lecture by Marisa Bozarth - Myth, mysteries and lore – from the well known “Jersey Devil” to less familiar tales – are tucked under the deep cover of the county’s 40 municipalities. Spooky stuff, like witches and a portal to another dimension will be revealed by Marisa Bozarth, the county’s Museum Curator, History, who has collected her trove on the job over the past 15 years.

 

 

 

 

 

Blog Index
The journal that this archive was targeting has been deleted. Please update your configuration.
Navigation

Photo Gallery > The History of Timbuctoo

The Shipman Mansion Foundation welcomes historian Paul W. Schopp back to Edgewater Park for his October 29 program on Timbuctoo, the slavery-era village near Mount Holly where fugitives made their homes. Beginning in the mid-1820s, four fugitive slaves from Maryland established the small enclave to offer a permanent residence for other runaways. No local people of color resided in Timbuctoo, as its founders reserved the land and dwellings for those who had slipped their shackles down south. The settlement grew and thrived, despite slave-catcher incursions, fugitive slave trials in Mount Holly, and the passage of the 1850 federal Fugitive Slave Law. In the Wednesday presentation at the Shipman Mansion – home of the Red Dragon Canoe Club – Schopp will use Powerpoint images to recreate the village and discuss the deprivations endured by its residents who, though they remained following the Civil War, had vanished from the landscape by 1920. Schopp, a professional historian who has documented local history for the past 40 years, became fascinated in 1990 with myriad black history topics in southern New Jersey and initiated documentary research into these topics. He has prepared or participated in preparing successful National Register of Historic Places nominations for Mount Peace Cemetery in Lawnside and Macedonia African Methodist Episcopal Church in Camden, both in Camden County; and Jacob’s Chapel and the Colemantown Meeting House in Mount Laurel, Burlington County. He also conducted exhaustive research and prepared a full history of Locust Hill Cemetery, a black burial ground located in Trenton, Mercer County. Schopp’s Timbuctoo program will begin at 7 p.m. at the Mansion, 221 Edgewater Avenue, Edgewater Park. One of a series of monthly educational and cultural programs presented by the Shipman Mansion Foundation, the event is free to the public and deserts will be served.